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Author: Michael Zand

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Most experienced UFC fighter, by division

Vitor Belfort made his MMA debut in October 1996, so one would think his experience would be very valuable when he takes on 25-year-old light heavyweight champion Jon Jones. However, Belfort is not even the most experienced challenger Jones has met during his reign as 205-pound titleholder.

The Brazilian's 30 career bouts have prepared him well for almost any UFC opponent, but Jones possesses unparalleled talent and has already proven he can handle veterans of the sport with relative ease. Throw in a significant size disadvantage, and Belfort has his hands full in trying to reclaim the UFC's light heavyweight belt.

Still, whether it was deserved or not, the fact that Belfort is even competing in a UFC title fight at this late stage in his career is an accomplishment in itself. Nearly 16 years have passed since Belfort knocked out Jon Hess to begin his career, making him one of the longest tenured fighters competing inside the Octagon today.

These are the most experienced fighters in each of the UFC's eight weight divisions.

Heavyweight
Alistair Overeem
Debut: October 24, 1999

Light Heavyweight
Quinton "Rampage" Jackson
Debut: November 13, 1999

Middleweight
Wanderlei Silva
Debut: November 1, 1996

Welterweight
Brian Ebersole
Debut: February 24, 2000

Lightweight
Dennis Hallman
Debut: May 18, 1996

Featherweight
Bart Palaszewski
Debut: January 27, 2002

Bantamweight
Johnny Eduardo
Debut: November 1, 1996

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UFC 151 was at least a $40 million dollar hit for all parties involved

While people can debate forever on who was right or wrong, and who deserves what blame for the cancellation of UFC 151, there is no question who financially is taking the biggest hit.

While Jon Jones may make a few less bucks, since he fights on a pay-per-view percentage, facing Vitor Belfort as compared with a fight with Dan Henderson or Chael Sonnen, whatever losses he suffers are paltry in comparison to those of the UFC itself, as well as the cable and satellite industry throughout North America, and countless businesses in Las Vegas.

When Dana White was interviewed by Ariel Helwani on Tuesday night's UFC Tonight show, he noted the company had already spent $2 million in marketing costs for UFC 151 at the time the decision was made to pull the plug, because Jones wouldn't agree to face late replacement Sonnen. But that's only a tiny part of the picture. For UFC, the irretrievable losses incurred by the event not taking place will almost surely be well into eight figures. One source in UFC estimated the figure at $20 million. And that is just for the company.

There are similar losses when it comes to a number of businesses in Las Vegas like hotels and restaurants, taxis, clubs, and weekend gambling revenue from those attending. There is also a somewhat conservative estimate of $7.5 million in losses that won't be made up for both cable and satellite companies throughout North America based on projections for what would have been the revenue from UFC 151 and UFC 152, which will now only be revenue from UFC 152.

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GSP plans to finish Condit to silence critics, hints at possible 185 move

“I want to finish because of the criticism,” said St. Pierre. “I’ve listened to the critics and I want to become more opportunistic.”

“(It bugs me) but at the same time, my last fight wasn’t that great. I got poked in the eye.”

“I can make up a bunch of excuses but the truth is I’m fighting the best guys all the time and it’s tough competition. You cannot always win by beautiful fashion. The guy that is in front of me is a very good guy. He’s the No. 1 contender all the time and now I’m fighting the (interim) world champ in Carlos Condit. I’m working a lot more on being more opportunistic and it’s going to pay off I’m sure.”

“When I see an opportunity, I don’t need to overthink it and I need to go for it,” he says.

“I think that my opponents have become better in time. Sometimes, when you break a guy mentally, he doesn’t fight to win anymore, he fights to not lose and to survive. That minimizes the opportunity for him to be finished. And that’s what’s happening in a lot of my fights and it’s hard to finish a guy who doesn’t fight to win.”

“The biggest challenge is that he’s a very smart, very well-rounded guy,” says St. Pierre, who boasts a 22-2 record.

I’m 120% says GSP in regards to his health.

 

“I don’t focus on that right now,” said St. Pierre.

“If I move up to 185-pounds, I’m going to stay at 185 and I’m not coming back.”

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VIDEO: UFC 152: Jones vs Belfort Extended Preview

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VIDEO: Big Nog: I'm 100% recovered

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GSP not considering Silva fight, looks to new match-ups in division

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Mike Swick talks about his epic comeback to the UFC

LINK

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Brock Lesnar Vs. Fedor: Dream Fight To Come True?

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UFC President: Machida not next in line for title fight

After Lyoto Machida knocked out Ryan Bader at UFC on FOX 4, it was all but a guarantee that Machida would be next in line for a chance to revenge his loss to Jon Jones and fight for the UFC light heavyweight title.

After the recent UFC 151 incident, it seems that is no longer the case. Machida was given the chance to fight Jon Jones at UFC 152 on four weeks notice, and declined the fight. He will now not be next in line, White revealed in an interview with Ariel Helwani tonight. White had spoken with Machida's manager, Ed Soares, who also expected Machida to take the fight. Machida we said he didn't have the time to prepare, did not accept, and in at least White's eyes, has moved down the ladder to face the champion.

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White: UFC 151 fighters were compensated

Tonight in an interview with Ariel Helwani, UFC President Dana White revealed that some of the fighters that were scheduled for UFC 151, but  had their fights rescheduled months away, were indeed 'compensated'.

Earlier reports from media had indicated that the rules of the Nevada State Athletic Commission would require the UFC to offer these fighters bouts on the next scheduled card or to pay their 'show' money.

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